Countdown to Brexit:54 days – As Theresa May returns to Europe, the EU closes the door on renegotiation of the deal - and takes three more steps to prepare for a no-deal

Theresa May sought and got the backing of Parliament to return to Europe in the hope of re-opening negotiations on the draft Treaty that she had negotiated and agreed with the remaining 27 EU member states in November.  This in recognition that the deal had been soundly rejected by MPs on behalf of the Nation.

As she goes back, cap in hand, there has been a unanimous rejection of any suggestion that the deal could be re-examined.  This is across all 27 countries, and in particular Ireland whose border with Northern Ireland would be most severely affected.  It includes the European Parliament, European Commission and European Council of 27 Heads of State – and whose unanimous agreement would be needed to make any changes to timetables or content of the Brexit arrangements.

The EU has published the entire joint letter from President Tusk and President Juncker to Theresa May, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom.  We have quoted it in full, below.

Meanwhile, the European Commission – equivalent to the EU’s ‘civil service’ – has continued to prepare for a no-deal Brexit.  Three documents published this week address aviation, visa free travel for UK citizens, and EU security arrangements as part of their contingency planning.

The formal response from Europe to the Prime Minister’s letter - written after the Commons defeat – offers little hope of any amendment to the Withdrawal Agreement and Political Declaration.  The choice for MPs in the re-visit of the deal on February 14 looks increasingly like the binary choice of ‘the deal as it was agreed by Theresa May in November 2018 – or no-deal’.

Extracts from the Tusk and Juncker letter:

“The Withdrawal Agreement that you and the Leaders of the 27 EU Member States agreed after long negotiations is important…It represents a fair compromise and aims to ensure an orderly withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union - thereby limiting the negative consequences of Brexit.”

“We are not in a position to agree to anything that changes or is inconsistent with the Withdrawal Agreement”

“As for the link between the Withdrawal Agreement and the Political Declaration - to which you make reference in your letter - it can be made clear that these two documents, while being of a different nature, are part of the same negotiated package.”  

“Finally - in response to your concern about the timetable, we would like to make it clear that both of us will be prepared to sign the Withdrawal Agreement as soon as the meaningful vote has passed in the United Kingdom Parliament.”

Aviation Safety

From the day after Brexit the European Commission proposes: “a temporary mechanism to extend the validity of certificates for certain aeronautical products, parts and appliances - in order to allow the operators concerned and EASA sufficient time so that EASA can continue to issue the necessary certificates under article 68 of the regulation on common rules in the field of civil aviation - taking account of the UK's status as a third country.

Visa requirements for UK citizens after Brexit

EU ambassadors today agreed that, following Brexit, UK citizens coming to the Schengen area for a short stay (90 days in any 180 days) should be granted visa free travel. Ambassadors mandated the Council Presidency to start negotiations with the European Parliament on this legislative proposal.

EU PEACE programme

The EU is set to ensure that the current PEACE programme, which supports peace and reconciliation, can continue between the border counties of Ireland and Northern Ireland under all Brexit scenarios.

EU ambassadors today supported without amendments a proposal for a regulation which establishes rules for the continuation of the cooperation programmes across the Irish border in the event of the UK’s withdrawal from the EU without a negotiated agreement.

Background and full texts of the relevant EU documents

Joint letter of President Tusk and President Juncker to Theresa May, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom

“Thank you for your letter of 14 January 2019.

As you are well aware, we regret but respect the decision of the United Kingdom to leave the European Union.  We also consider that Brexit is a source of uncertainty and disruption.  In these challenging times, we therefore share with you the determination to create as much certainty and clarity as possible for citizens and companies in a situation where a Member State leaves the European Union after more than four decades of closest economic and political integration.  That is why the Withdrawal Agreement that you and the Leaders of the 27 EU Member States agreed after long negotiations is so important.  It represents a fair compromise and aims to ensure an orderly withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union, thereby limiting the negative consequences of Brexit.  That is also why we wish to establish as close as possible a relationship with the United Kingdom in the future, building on the Political Declaration, which the Leaders of the 27 EU Member States agreed with you.  It is also why we want negotiations to this effect to start as soon as possible after the withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union.

As you know, we are not in a position to agree to anything that changes or is inconsistent with the Withdrawal Agreement, but against this background, and in order to facilitate the next steps of the process, we are happy to confirm, on behalf of the two EU Institutions we represent, our understanding of the following points within our respective fields of responsibility.

A. As regards the President of the European Council:

On the 13 December, the European Council (Article 50) decided on a number of additional assurances, in particular as regards its firm commitment to work speedily on a subsequent agreement that establishes by 31 December 2020 alternative arrangements, so that the backstop will not need to be triggered.

The European Council also said that, if the backstop were nevertheless to be triggered, it would only apply temporarily, unless and until it is superseded by a subsequent agreement that ensures that a hard border is avoided, and that the European Union, in such a case, would use its best endeavours to negotiate and conclude expeditiously a subsequent agreement that would replace the backstop, and would expect the same of the United Kingdom, so that the backstop would only be in place for as long as strictly necessary.

In this context, it can be stated that European Council conclusions have a legal value in the Union commensurate to the authority of the European Council under the Treaties to define directions and priorities for the European Union at the highest level and, in the specific context of withdrawal, to establish, in the form of guidelines, its framework. They may commit the European Union in the most solemn manner. European Council conclusions therefore constitute part of the context in which an international agreement, such as the Withdrawal Agreement, will be interpreted.

As for the link between the Withdrawal Agreement and the Political Declaration, to which you make reference in your letter, it can be made clear that these two documents, while being of a different nature, are part of the same negotiated package.  In order to underline the close relationship between the two texts, they can be published side by side in the Official Journal in a manner reflecting the link between the two as provided for in Article 50 of the Treaty on European Union (TEU).

B. As regards the President of the European Commission:

The Political Declaration agreed at the November Special European Council (Article 50) describes a future relationship of unprecedented depth and breadth, reflecting the continuing strength of our shared values and interests.  The Withdrawal Agreement and the Political Declaration represent a fair balance of European Union and United Kingdom interests.  They will ensure a smooth withdrawal and a strong future relationship in the interests of all our citizens.

As the European Council has already stated, it will embark on preparations for a future partnership with the United Kingdom immediately after signature of the Withdrawal Agreement.  As regards the European Commission, we will set up the negotiating structure for these negotiations directly after signature to ensure that formal negotiations can start as soon as possible after the withdrawal of the United Kingdom, having in mind the shared ambition of the European Union and the United Kingdom to have the future relationship in place by the end of the transition.  Should national ratifications be pending at that moment, the Commission is ready to propose provisional application of relevant parts of the future relationship, in line with the legal frameworks that apply and existing practice.  The Commission is also ready to engage with you on a work programme as soon as the United Kingdom Parliament has signalled its agreement in principle to the Withdrawal Agreement and the European Parliament has approved it.

There is an important link between the Withdrawal Agreement and the Political Declaration, reflecting Article 50 of the Treaty on European Union.  As stated in Article 184 of the Withdrawal Agreement and reflected also in Paragraph 138 of the Political Declaration, the European Union and the United Kingdom have committed to use best endeavours, in good faith and in full respect of their respective legal orders, to take necessary steps to negotiate expeditiously the agreements governing their future relationship referred to in the Political Declaration.

In light of your letter, the European Commission would like to make the following clarifications with regard to the backstop:

The Withdrawal Agreement including the Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland embodies the shared commitment by the European Union and the United Kingdom to address the unique circumstances on the island of Ireland as part of ensuring the orderly withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union.  The Commission can confirm that, just like the United Kingdom, the European Union does not wish to see the backstop enter into force.  Were it to do so, it would represent a suboptimal trading arrangement for both sides.  The Commission can also confirm the European Union’s determination to replace the backstop solution on Northern Ireland by a subsequent agreement that would ensure the absence of a hard border on the island of Ireland on a permanent footing.

The European Commission can also confirm our shared understanding that the Withdrawal Agreement and the Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland:

Do not affect or supersede the provisions of the Good Friday or Belfast Agreement of 10 April 1998 in any way whatsoever; they do not alter in any way the arrangements under Strand II of the 1998 Agreement in particular, whereby areas of North-South cooperation in areas within their respective competences are matters for the Northern Ireland Executive and Government of Ireland to determine;

Do not extend regulatory alignment with European Union law in Northern Ireland beyond what is strictly necessary to avoid a hard border on the island of Ireland and protect the 1998 Agreement; the Withdrawal Agreement is also clear that any new act that the European Union proposes should be added to the Protocol will require the agreement of the United Kingdom in the Joint Committee;

Do not prevent the United Kingdom from facilitating, as part of its delegation, the participation of Northern Ireland Executive representatives in the Joint Committee, the Committee on issues related to the implementation of the Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland, or the joint consultative working group, in matters pertaining directly to Northern Ireland.

The European Commission also shares your intentions for the future relationship to be in place as quickly as possible.  Given our joint commitment to using best endeavours to conclude before the end of 2020 a subsequent agreement, which supersedes the Protocol in whole or in part, the Commission is determined to give priority in our work programme to the discussion of proposals that might replace the backstop with alternative arrangements. In this context, facilitative arrangements and technologies will be considered.  Any arrangements which supersede the Protocol are not required to replicate its provisions in any respect, provided that the underlying objectives continue to be met.

Should the parties need more time to negotiate the subsequent agreement, they could decide to extend the transition period, as foreseen in the Withdrawal Agreement.  In that case, the Commission is committed to redouble its efforts and expects the same redoubled efforts from your negotiators, with the aim of concluding a subsequent agreement very rapidly.  Were the backstop to enter into force in whole or in part, it is intended to apply only temporarily, unless and until it is superseded by a subsequent agreement.  The Commission is committed to providing the necessary political impetus and resources to help achieving the objective of making this period as short as possible. To this end, following the withdrawal of the United Kingdom, and until a subsequent agreement is concluded, the Commission will support making best use of the high level conference foreseen in the Political Declaration to meet at least every six months to take stock of progress and agree the appropriate actions to move forward.

Finally, in response to your concern about the timetable, we would like to make it clear that both of us will be prepared to sign the Withdrawal Agreement as soon as the meaningful vote has passed in the United Kingdom Parliament.  This will allow preparations for the future partnership with the United Kingdom immediately thereafter to ensure that negotiations can start as soon as possible after the withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union.”

Aviation Safety

The EU is taking the steps which are needed to continue to ensure a high level of aviation safety in its airspace the event that the UK leaves the EU without a negotiated agreement.  Today, the Council's Permanent Representatives Committee approved a mandate for the presidency to start talks with the European Parliament on a proposal to ensure continued validity of certain aviation safety certificates.

The new provisions concern natural and legal persons with their principal place of business in the UK and certain situations regarding training modules.

The European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) is responsible for the issuance of type certificates and organisation approvals in the EU. After its withdrawal, the UK will resume these tasks under its obligations as 'State of design' under the Chicago Convention on International Civil Aviation.

The mandate sets up a temporary mechanism to extend the validity of certificates for certain aeronautical products, parts and appliances, in order to allow the operators concerned and EASA sufficient time so that EASA can continue to issue the necessary certificates under article 68 of the regulation on common rules in the field of civil aviation, taking account of the UK's status as a third country.

The draft regulation is to enter into force as a matter of urgency. It will be applicable the day after the EU treaties cease to apply to and in the UK unless a withdrawal agreement concluded with the UK has entered into force by that date. However, in order to allow for the necessary administrative procedures to be carried out as early as possible, certain provisions will apply from the regulation's entry into force.

The final text will need to be approved by the Council and the European Parliament.

Visa Requirements for UK citizens travelling to EU after Brexit

EU ambassadors today agreed that, following Brexit, UK citizens coming to the Schengen area for a short stay (90 days in any 180 days) should be granted visa free travel. Ambassadors mandated the Council Presidency to start negotiations with the European Parliament on this legislative proposal.

According to EU rules, visa exemption is granted on condition of reciprocity. The government of the United Kingdom has stated that it does not intend to require a visa from EU citizens travelling to the UK for short stays. In the event that the United Kingdom introduces a visa requirement for nationals of at least one member state in the future, the existing reciprocity mechanism would apply and the three institutions and the member states would commit to act without delay in applying the mechanism.

Visa policy towards third country citizens travelling to the Schengen area for a short stay is regulated under EU legislation. Existing rules include all third country nationals under one of two lists: nationals of third countries required to be in possession of a visa and those exempt from this requirement. Following Brexit, as a third country the United Kingdom will need to appear under one of these two lists.

EU PEACE programme

The EU is set to ensure that the current PEACE programme, which supports peace and reconciliation, can continue between the border counties of Ireland and Northern Ireland under all Brexit scenarios.

EU ambassadors today supported without amendments a proposal for a regulation which establishes rules for the continuation of the cooperation programmes across the Irish border in the event of the UK’s withdrawal from the EU without a negotiated agreement.

In addition to the PEACE IV programme, the regulation also covers the INTERREG VA programme which promotes economic, social and territorial cohesion across Northern Ireland, the border counties of Ireland and Western Scotland.

The two programmes would continue to be financed from the EU budget on the basis of the current management structures also under a “no deal” scenario. The funding levels would remain unchanged until the end of 2020.

The European Parliament at committee level gave its green light to the proposed regulation last week, also endorsing it without changes. As a result, no negotiations between the Council and the Parliament are planned for this file. The EP is expected to formally adopt its position at first reading at its first plenary session in March. The adoption in the Council is scheduled for mid-March.

The EU co-legislators are working rapidly to ensure that the regulation can enter into force by 29 March 2019.

 
John ShuttleworthComment